Integration of CUCM with CUC

Posted: December 17, 2015 in Communications

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Hi, folks

Here I am once again to deliver another chapter of our series on Cisco Unified Communications.

This article will cover the integration of Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CUCM) and Cisco Unity Connection (CUC). After this integration we will be making some real tests with our IP Phones (Cisco IP Communicators) to see if it all works.

 

Cisco Unified Communications Manager is an enterprise-class IP telephony call-processing system that provides traditional telephony features as well as advanced capabilities, such as mobility, presence, preference, and rich conferencing services.

Read more here.

Cisco Unity Connection is a robust unified messaging and voicemail solution that provides users with flexible message access options and IT with management simplicity.

Read more here.

 

On this article I won’t be showing how to install Cisco Unity Connection as it is actually the same process as installing CUCM, which we already covered.

One other thing you need to know is that CUC actually comes on the same .ISO file of CUCM.

This is what we will use on this LAB:

  • VMware Workstation version 11.1.3
  • GNS3 version 1.3.11 (for NTP Server)
  • c3725-adventerprisek9-mz.124-15.T7.bin (IOS – not iOS 🙂 – which we will use on GNS3…GNS3’s Routers don’t come with an IOS, this is why we need at least one for now)
  • Cisco Unified Communications Manager version 9.1 installed on VMware Workstation
  • Cisco Unity Connection version 9.1 installed on VMware Workstation
  • Windows Server (any version you like…I used 2012) to use Active Directory
  • Mozilla Firefox version 42.0
  • Cisco IP Communicator version 8.6.1.0

 

Note:

I won’t be providing any of these softwares. They can be found on the vendors sites for download. The IOS for GNS3 can be found on the Web, just make a Bing Search and you will find them.

 

Observation:

I installed Cisco Unity Connection on VMware Workstation using these hardware specifications:

2GB of vRAM,  200GB of vDisk, 1 vNIC and 1vCPU.

The network parameters I have used so far are:

GW / VMware Network Adapter VMNet1: 10.10.10.1/24

CUCM: 10.10.10.3/24

CUC: 10.10.10.4/24

Windows Server 2012: 10.10.10.6/24

NTP Server on Cisco Router on GNS3: 10.10.10.8/24


 

 

So, let’s get started.

1. CUCM: On the Cisco Unified CM Administration page, go to Advanced Features > Voice Mail > Cisco Voice Mail Port Wizard

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2. First step to do is the creation of a new Voice Mail Server. Give this Voice Mail Server a proper name

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3. Add Voice Mail ports to this Voice Mail Server we created. I have set two, which, for this LAB will be enough

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4. Now let’s configure Device Information for Voice Mail ports. These settings will be applied to all new ports.7.PNG

5. The ports we configured (two) need Directory Numbers – DNs – to work, so, lets configure what will be our first DN for the first created port. The system will automatically assign the next available DN for the new created ports.

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6. We will want to add these DN to a Line Group

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Quick Quiz:

A line group allows you to designate the order in which directory numbers are chosen.


 

7. Let’s give a proper name for this Line Group

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8. Next step is the confirmation of all we have configured so far. Confirm it by clicking on Finish

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9. Once it finishes, the system will give us the summary of what was done. There are two steps missing in order to use these 2 voice mail ports we have created :

  • Add the Line Group we created to a new or existing Hunt List;
  • Assign the new or existing Hunt List to a Hunt Pilot.

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10. First thing first, right? Let’s create this Hunt List. Click on Hunt List in order to open the Hunt Lists page then click on Add New

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11. Give a proper name for the Hunt List then click on Save

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12. After clicking on Save the system will refresh the page and give you more options to configure. Click on Add Line Group

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13. Select the Line Group we created during the Cisco Voice Mail Port Wizard process and click Save.

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Click Save again so that you can save the configurations we made on the Hunt List.

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Quick quiz:

A Hunt List lists a set of Line groups in a specific order. A hunt list then associates with one or more hunt pilots and determines the order in which those line groups are accessed. The order controls the progress of the search for available directory numbers for incoming calls.


 

14. Now let’s go to the Hunt Pilot page by heading to Call Routing > Route/Hunt > Hunt Pilot

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15. Click on Add New

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17. Give this Hunt Pilot a Directory Number and select the Hunt List we created on our last step then click Save

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Quick Quiz:

The Hunt Pilot is the number users call to reach Cisco Unity Connection.


 

17. Next step we are going to create our Message Waiting. Go to Advanced Features > Voice Mail > Message Waiting

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18. Click Add New

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19. Our first MWI will be the DN Users call to deactivate Message Waiting

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20. The second MWI will be the DN Users call to activate Message Waiting

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Quick Quiz:

The Message Waiting Configuration window allows you to define a message waiting on or message waiting off directory number that a directory-connected based voice-messaging system uses to determine whether to set or clear a message waiting indication for a particular Cisco Unified IP Phone.


 

21. Now the next thing we will create is our Voice Mail Pilot. Go to Advanced Features > Voice Mail > Voice Mail Pilot. Then click on Add New

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22. Give this Voice Mail Pilot the same DN we used for Hunt Pilot (I used 2050). Don’t forget to check the checkbox in order to make this the default Voice Mail Pilot for the system

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Quick Quiz:

The Voice Mail Pilot number designates the directory number that you dial to access your voice messages. Cisco Unified Communications Manager automatically dials the voice-messaging number when you press the Messages button on your phone.


 

23. Now go to Advanced Features > Voice Mail > Voice Mail Profile and click Add New

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24. Give a proper name for this Voice Mail Profile, select the Voice Mail Pilot we created, make it the default Voice Mail Profile for the system and click Save

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Quick Quiz:

The Voice Mail Profile Configuration window of Cisco Unified Communications Manager Administration allows you to define any line-related voice-messaging information. A voice-mail profile gets assigned to a directory number, not a device.


 

25. Now we will configure our IP Phones in order to automatically make them redirect the calls to the Voice Mail if they are not answered within a specific time.

Go to the first IP Phone and click the line we want to configure (I only have one line per IP Phone). Devices > Phones

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26 Scroll down to the Call Forward and Call Pickup Settings and check the indicated checkboxes and set a ‘No Answer Ring Duration’ (I have set 10 seconds).

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Do this for the second IP Phone a well.

 

First stage on Cisco Unified Communications Manager is done. Missing part now is on the Cisco Unity Connections Server.

If you want to take a break feel free. This article will be here waiting for you. 🙂

 

27. Let’s go to our Cisco Unity Connection system and replace the hostname with the proper IP address of CUC in order to avoid too much DNS dependency

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28. Now let’s make some configurations in Telephony Integrations. First thing we will configure is the Phone System. Go to Telephony Integrations > Phone System and click on PhoneSystem

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29. Give a proper name and click on Save

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30. Now go to Port Group and click on Add New

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31. Set the Device Name Prefix, MWI On and MWI Off and CUCM Server IP Address then click Save

VERY IMPORTANT:

The Device Name Prefix MUST BE EXACTLY the same we configured on Cisco Voice Mail Port.

Just a reminder of what we configured:

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The MWI On Extension we configured is 2061.

The MWI Off Extension we configured is 2060.

Our CUCM Server IP Address is 10.10.10.3.

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Note:

When you try to save with the Voice Mail Server name you have configured, it will give an “error” saying that it must finish with “-VI”, so, add that after the Voice Mail Server Name.

32. Now go to Port and click Add New in order to create ports for this Port Group we added on the last step

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33. Set the number of Ports to 2 (two), exactly as we did during Cisco Voice Mail Port Wizard, and click Save

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As we can see below, we managed to create our ports:

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Next steps basically are about the Users. We can create local users (within Cisco Unity Connection) or sync them with LDAP (exactly how we did on CUCM). On this LAB I will use LDAP in order to sync the Users.

34. To do so, go to the Serviceability page of Unity Connection. Go to Tools > Service Activation

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35. Select the Cisco DirSync service and click Save so that the system can start it.

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36. Return to the Cisco Unity Connections Administration page and go to System Settings > LDAP > LDAP Setup and enable LDAP sync. I used Microsoft Active Directory, but feel free to choose any other LDAP system available.

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37. Now go to LDAP Authentication and add the authentication parameters of your LDAP Server

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38. Go to LDAP Directory Configuration and configure the right LDAP parameters and click on Save. After that click  on Perform Full Sync Now

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39. As we are dealing with “well protected” systems here, there are some authentication rules that are set by default. And to avoid that complexity on this LAB we will edit those Recommended Voice Mail Authentication Rules. Go to System Settings > Authentication Rules and click on Recommended Voice Mail Authentication Rule

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40. Set the minimum Credential Length to 4 and uncheck for trivial passwords then click Save

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41. Now go to Templates > User Templates and click on voicemailusertemplate so that we can edit some parameters, specifically the password field. For this LAB I used 1234 as the default password for the users.

 

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Note:

If we hadn’t change the Authentication Rule we couldn’t use this 1234 password, as it is extremely simple to use.

42. Now let’s import our users to our system. Go to Users > Import Users then select LDAP Directory and click Find

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43. These are the users which are synced with LDAP. Select the ones you want to import and don’t forget to set their proper extension numbers then click on Import Selected

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44. Go to Users > Users so that we can confirm that our users where successfully imported into our system

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In terms of configurations, we are “done”. I’m assuming you have done everything accordingly. Next step is…test if all works. 🙂

 

45. To test if what we did works, use the first CIPC Phone (DN 1001) and call the second CIPC (DN 1002). Wait 10 seconds (the time we configured on both DNs) without answering

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46. Voila!

After 10 seconds without answer, the phone automatically redirects the call to the Voice Mail, so the caller can record his message. I have recorded the message “Everyone Teach One

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When the user of CIPC 2 returns (assuming he/she was absent), he/she will check the following message on the IP Phone “You have VoiceMail” as we can see on the image below.

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THIS, folks, means that our configuration works 100%.

“Obviously” you asked yourself “How will the user check his voice mail anyway?”

Simple, remember the Voice Mail directory number we configured? Exactly what your remembered…, 2050.

So, all the user have to do is to dial to this Voice Mail Number. The system will automatically ask for a PIN which is……..yes, the one we edited on the User Template, 1234, and then voila….user hears my ugly voice saying “EVERYONE TEACH ONE”.


 

 

So, this is it….its over…for now. See you on OUR next article.

Any doubts, you can post your comments below as it can be somebody else’s doubt or you can send me an email:edsonvuma1@gmail.com.

Don’t forget the motto: EVERYONE TEACH ONE

See you soon

 

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Cisco Learning Network Store

Warm regards,

Edson Vuma

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Comments
  1. Anonymous says:

    Hi, there

    I have been following your blog back in the days.
    And what I have to say is #SuperbWork.
    I hope you write a book for Cisco one day.
    Of course is a long way but definitely what you are doing is parts of this long way.

    Success
    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Balla says:

    Cool stuff, thanks bro, you saved me lots of time with my project…

    Like

  3. […] via Integration of CUCM with CUC — Edson Vuma […]

    Like

  4. swathy edayath says:

    thank you so much for your post . I have successfully configured and tested VM 🙂

    Like

  5. Ahmed says:

    You are awesome man, this blog is just straight to the point, great effort, really appreciated

    Like

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